Monthly Archives: April 2014

Heartbleed Bug: Change your passwords


You may have seen a lot of press in the last couple of days about the ‘Heartbleed Bug’ – This bug is a vulnerability in the popular OpenSSL cryptographic software library which is responsible for encrypting data over the Internet for applications such as web, email, instant messaging and some virtual private networks.

The Heartbleed Bug allows anyone on the Internet to read the memory of the systems protected by the vulnerable versions of the OpenSSL software. This allows attackers to eavesdrop on communications, steal data directory from the services and users and to impersonate services and users.

Most of the popular websites have already patched the vulnerability; here is a list of some of these sites:

  • Google – Vulnerability Patched. Password change recommended.
  • Facebook – Vulnerability Patched. Password change recommended.
  • Instagram – Vulnerability Patched. Password change recommended.
  • Youtube – Vulnerability Patched. Password change recommended.
  • Yahoo! – Vulnerability Patched. Password change recommended.
  • Wikipedia – Vulnerability Patched. Password change recommended.
  • Bing – Vulnerability Patched. Password change recommended.
  • Live – Vulnerability Patched. Password change recommended.
  • MSN – Vulnerability Patched. Password change recommended.
  • Microsoft – Vulnerability Patched. Password change recommended.
  • Flickr – Vulnerability Patched. Password change recommended.

  • Here are some of the sites that were not affected by the Heartbleed Bug:

  • LinkedIn
  • eBay
  • PayPal
  • Twitter
  • It is recommended that you change your password on all of the above websites and if you use the same password elsewhere it is also recommended that you change that. However, the safest option is to change all of your passwords.

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    RIP Windows XP: Security deadline arrives

    Today is the day that we say goodbye to the great Windows XP Operating System, for the past 12 years it has been stretched to it’s limits in terms of security and performance but now the time has come for Microsoft to end support.

    This means that Microsoft will no longer be releasing any security updates for the operating system leaving users that still use it vulnerable to cyber attacks. Microsoft have released a final security patch containing fixes for a series of bugs including a vulnerability in Microsoft Word 2010 when a user opens a specially crafted ‘.RTF’ file typically found in junk emails that could allow remote code execution.

    What should you do now?

    Windows 7 should be considered as a path of upgrade as the system requirements are not high, you can gain better performance and it is far more secure. Most computers that run Windows XP can run Windows 7, some may just require the memory (RAM) to be upgraded in them to bring it in line with the system requirements.

    If you would like to know more or discuss your requirements then please give us a call.

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